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Human Experience Fall 2022

Quoting

Quoting is used when a group of words is copied identically to its original work or author. Quotes can appear in a long or short form, but must be credited to the original source and match word for word.

For short or long quotes, you should include the author, year of publication, and page number where the quote was originally published.

Short Quotations

 Short quotations are direct quotes that are fewer than 40 words. They must have quotation marks, and have in-text citations.

An example of a parenthetical citation:

"Many cultures in the past communicated solely in the oral tradition since many of them did not have a written language" (McCoy, 2008, p. 153).

An example of a signal phrase in a citation:

According to McCoy (2008), "Many cultures in the past communicated solely in the oral tradition since many of them did not have a written language" (p. 153).

Long Quotations

A long direct quote consists of 40 words or longer, and must be in a freestanding block of text. The entire quote should be 5 spaces (half an inch) from the left margin.

Do not use quotation marks around long quotes, and keep the text double-spaced.

The paranthetical citation should come after the closing punctuation mark.

One easy method to create a block of indented text:

  • Type the entire quotation.
  • Use your mouse to highlight the entire quote.
  • While the quote is highlighted, click the TAB key on your computer keyboard (most TAB indents are set at 0.5").
  • This should indent the entire quote 0.5" and create a block quote.