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CM 498: Communication Research: Researching Artifacts

Resources for Professor Janack's Communication Research class.

Sources for artifacts

Artifacts for a rhetorical analysis can come in many forms.  Here are a few suggestions:

  • Speeches
  • Novels, poems
  • Art exhibits
  • Advertising
  • Film or documentary film
  • Song lyrics
  • Social media

Artifacts should not have a a single, clear meaning, but be open to interpretation.  A good artifact addresses a certain problem, and encourages a specific action to change the situation.

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Finding Artifacts

Finding Information Relevant to Artifacts

Context

What was the political/social/cultural climate in which your artifact was created? How does it relate to the intention of the artifact you are analyzing? 

Resources for finding context:

 

 

People

Who are the relevant people related to your artifact?  These may include the author, as well as specific groups or people mentioned in the artifact.

Resources for biographical information:

Outcomes

What are the relevant statistics related to your artifact? How have others reacted to the artifact, within the popular media, or scholarly studies?

Resources for finding outcomes: