Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
ONESEARCH JOURNALS & NEWSPAPERS DATABASES INTERLIBRARY LOAN RESEARCH GUIDES GET HELP

RE240: Religion, Power, and Difference: Articles

Research guide for Religion 240: Religion, Power, and Difference taught by Professor Amy Langenberg.

Popular vs. Scholarly (Peer Reviewed)

View this short video to learn quick visual tips for identifying the difference between a scholarly and popular article. (1:32 minutes)

What are secondary sources?

Secondary Source

A secondary source analyzes or interprets a primary source.

Secondary sources include:

  • Comments on, interpretations of, or discussions about the original material. These can include print, film, audio recordings, etc.
  • Articles in newspapers and magazines
  • Reviews of books and movies
  • Articles in scholarly journals that evaluate someone else's original research, work of art, or work of creative writing

Think of secondary sources as second-hand information. If I tell you something, I am the primary source. If you tell someone else what I told you, you are the secondary source. 

Start Searching for Articles

OneSearch FAQs

Google Scholar

Google Scholar Search

JSTOR

JSTOR Logo



Search in:
 

Need help? See the "How to Search JSTOR" guide.

Subject Specific Databases