Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
ONESEARCH JOURNALS & NEWSPAPERS DATABASES INTERLIBRARY LOAN RESEARCH GUIDES GET HELP REPORT IT

Avoiding Plagiarism

Quoting

What is Quoting?

  • Quoting is when you use the exact words from the original source/author(s).  

  • You MUST cite the original source, both in-text and in your references/works cited.


When to Quote?

  • Use quotes sparingly.

  • Quote when the original meaning of the statement would be lost by rewording.

  • Quote when the original words are particularly impactful or eloquent.

  • Quote when you are presenting an opposing viewpoint with which you intent to argue.

  • Quote when you want the authority of the author's words to back up your argument.

  • Quote when you intend to analyze the original author's statement.


Do not overuse quotes - a good rule of thumb is that no more than 10% of your paper should be direct quotes.

Overuse of quotes may indicate to your professor that:

  • you don't understand the material.

  • you did not thoroughly research your topic.

  • you rushed.

  • you are unable to synthesize the material you read.


How to Quote

  • You MUST cite the original source, both in-text and in your references/works cited.

  • Short quotes (less than 40 words) must be in double quotation marks.

  • Long quotes (more than 40 words) must be in a block quote.

  • Be sure to introduce and/or contextualize your quote - who are you quoting and/or why are you using this quote?